Cornelius Naujoks was a millionaire for nearly nine months — but didn’t know it. Picture: Lotto Max

.06m lottery ticket found after nine months

FOR months on end, a life-changing scrap of paper sat unnoticed on Cornelius Naujoks’s desk.

The Canadian man, from the small town of Whitecourt in the province of Alberta, had bought a Lotto Max lottery ticket months earlier but had forgotten to check it properly.

There it sat, discarded, for nine long months — until he decided to tidy up his home office.

During the clean he spotted the ticket, and finally checked it.

To his amazement, he discovered he had won .06 million.

“I got pretty emotional,” he told Lotto Max after he discovered he had hit the jackpot.

According to the Edmonton Sun, Mr Naujoks won the prize after matching the numbers 3, 10, 25, 26, 33, 39 and 47 to one of the draws from December 15, 2017.

At the time, he had checked his ticket against the main draw numbers — but he didn’t check the 15 sets of MaxMillions numbers also drawn on the same day.

“I was organising my desk a few weeks ago and found a big stack of lottery tickets,” he told the publication.

One of those was the Lotto Max ticket, which he had purchased at Shefield & Sons at Northgate Centre in Edmonton.

“I took them to the store — I couldn’t believe it when I scanned this ticket and all of the zeros came up on the screen,” he said.

Cornelius Naujoks was a millionaire for nearly nine months — but didn’t know it. Picture: Lotto Max

Cornelius Naujoks was a millionaire for nearly nine months — but didn’t know it. Picture: Lotto MaxSource:Supplied

He told the Edmonton Journal he planned to spend his win on a new house and car.

“I’ve already spoken to someone at the dealership,” he said. “I would really like to buy a Ford Mustang GT.”

It’s been a big week for Canadian lottery winners — earlier this week, the saga of aunt and nephew Barbara Reddick and Tyrone MacInnes finally came to an end after a bitter two-month legal battle.

After the pair jointly won a .23 million prize — as both names were on the ticket — Ms Reddick announced she was suing her 19-year-old nephew for his share, claiming she never agreed to split the winnings.

The pair ended up reaching an agreement before it reached the courts, with Ms Reddick pocketing around ,000 while the teen was awarded just ,507.

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